How do you hire remote workers?

How to Hire Remote Workers

We’ve talked a lot on Remote Justice about how to be a productive remote worker and managing productive remote workers– but how do you actually find and hire remote workers? Thankfully the Society for Human Resource Management has you covered! Their article “How to Hire Remote Workers– And Keep Them Productive and Happy” gives you the low-down on this process.

We especially appreciate the feature on unique challenges organizations can face while hiring remote workers– how do you handle a potential technological learning curve? How can you assess a job candidate without actually meeting them in person? We love this great trait that Kaplan Test Prep looks for in their remote workers:

The one trait Kaplan does especially look for in its remote workers? A willingness to ask for both feedback and help when it is needed. “Someone can’t walk by and see that you’re struggling with something” when working from home, Kent said. For this reason, the company seeks employees who willingly “raise their hand and say, ‘I don’t know how to teach this,’ or ‘I’m struggling with this student.’”

Once you figure out your organization’s hiring norms for remote workers, the article gives some good tips on how to keep them productive! Read the Society for Human Resource Management’s full article here.

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The Discipline Needed for Remote Work

A calming image of a sunset, reflective water, and a pile of stones.
Getting to know our colleagues not only informs how we do our jobs, but helps us develop deeper connections to our work. One of the things we at Provide have learned through our reliance on remote work is that socialization has to be deliberate. We can’t just assume that we will learn about each other or build a supportive organizational culture naturally. Interview can be an important tool.

Here’s the second interview in the Provide in Profile series: Wyndi Anderson, Provide‘s Senior Director of Programs, talks about the challenges of remote work, the discipline required, and what she does to help her maintain that discipline! She offers some helpful ideas for workers wondering about pace and reflection.

Socializing with Intent

Silhouettes of figures sitting with differently shaped thought bubbles above their heads.
Getting to know our colleagues not only informs how we do our jobs, but helps us develop deeper connections to our work. One of the things we at Provide have learned through our reliance on remote work is that socialization has to be deliberate. We can’t just assume that we will learn about each other or build a supportive organizational culture naturally.  To that end, the Provide Communications Intern began an interview project; she first interviewed Provide‘s Deputy Director, Jenny O’Donnell, about her role, what surprises her about the work, “secret” passions, and more! For managers looking for ways to incorporate better socialization practices into their remote work, this may be an interesting resource!